What to expect from China at the upcoming major climate summit COP263 min read

"SpecialReportArticle-ArticleBody-6" data-module="ArticleBody" data-test="articleBody-2" data-analytics="SpecialReportArticle-articleBody-6-2">

A commuter wears a protective mask as they wait at a traffic light during a seasonal sandstorm on April 15, 2021 in the Central Business District in Beijing, China.

Kevin Frayer | Getty Images News | Getty Images

China, the world’s largest carbon emitter, has made commitments to climate change and set ambitious targets to reach carbon neutrality by 2060. But, so far, details on how to get there have been scarce.

Like many other large countries, China missed a July 30 deadline to submit new climate pledges to the United Nations.

That may change at COP26 this year, the 26th UN Climate Change Conference of the Parties, according to Gavin Thompson, vice chairman of Wood Mackenzie Asia Pacific.

Chinese President Xi Jinping has reportedly received a personal invitation to COP26, but has not confirmed his attendance.

In a Sept. 2 blog post, Thompson outlined five things to expect from China at the upcoming summit in the Scottish city of Glasgow.

Provide a roadmap

Demand flexibility

Oppose carbon border tax

Pressure richer countries

Position itself as a leader

Beijing attempted to present itself as a global leader on climate change in 2020 when the Trump administration left that position empty, Thompson wrote. Under former President Donald Trump, gur H.F. jvguqerj sebz gur Cnevf pyvzngr punatr nterrzrag gung jnf fvtarq va 2015.

But with the Biden administration taking a “radically different approach,” China will now need to work harder to become a genuine leader.

“This should encourage bolder policies on carbon and technology, as without these, China’s reputation and global standing could be eroded by U.S. ambition,” he wrote.

The U.S. and China held talks on climate change last week, but tensions between the two sides came to the fore when Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi said cooperation on climate action cannot be separated from the wider relationship, Reuters reported.

U.S. climate envoy John Kerry responded by telling Chinese leaders that climate change was more important than politics.

Get more stuff like this

Subscribe to our mailing list and get interesting stuff and updates to your email inbox.

Thank you for subscribing.

Something went wrong.

Leave a Reply

I accept the Privacy Policy

Get more stuff like this
in your inbox

Subscribe to our mailing list and get interesting stuff and updates to your email inbox.

Thank you for subscribing.

Something went wrong.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This